McGill to build in Berkeley County, create up to 25 jobs - WCIV-TV | ABC News 4 - Charleston News, Sports, Weather

McGill to build in Berkeley County, create up to 25 jobs

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MONCKS CORNER, S.C. -- McGill Environmental Systems of N.C. Inc., the U.S. Composting Council's Composter of the Year for 2011, plans to open its seventh organics recycling facility by the end of 2013, locating it in Berkeley County, S.C. The company expects to hire up to 25 people to staff the facility.

"The location offers proximity to markets in a community with a positive business environment and progressive approach to green waste management," said M. Noel Lyons, president of McGill. "Berkeley is a model for the future, clearly demonstrating how the public and private sectors can work together to deliver economically and environmentally-superior services without the burden of public financing or operations."

The state-of-the-art, indoor compost manufacturing plant will be constructed on the site of Berkeley County Water and Sanitation's (BCWS) current yard waste operation off U.S. Hwy. 52 near Moncks Corner.

"Today's announcement is another win for South Carolina. More and more companies are learning the benefits of doing business in the Palmetto State. We celebrate McGill Environmental Systems' decision to open its new plant in Moncks Corner and create up to 25 new jobs there," said Gov. Nikki Haley.

The project, a public-private collaboration between BCWS and McGill, represents the culmination of two years of planning for the industrial-scale, regional facility. The facility will be built on county land but owned and operated by McGill. The company will accept and process a wide variety of biodegradable materials from municipal, commercial and industrial generators for use as feedstocks in the production of its line of premium compost products for the professional sports turf, landscaping and stormwater/erosion control markets. It also sells bulk and bagged products through retail lawn and garden centers.

"South Carolina has developed a strong recycling sector, and today's announcement builds on that. McGill Environmental Systems' decision to open its new facility in Berkeley County is another sign our business climate is just right. Every one of these jobs will have impact in Moncks Corner," said Secretary of Commerce Bobby Hitt.

McGill-Berkeley will be a fully-enclosed processing facility utilizing a scientifically-enhanced composting process based on an aerated static pile method developed by Rutgers University, augmented with computerized controls and a biofiltration system.

"Berkeley County's partnership with McGill provides a viable and sustainable waste management solution," said Dan Davis, Berkeley County supervisor. "McGill's stellar reputation and proven processes make them an excellent partner in our ongoing effort to maximize our landfill efficiency and promote ‘green' productivity."

"McGill's decision to locate here says a lot about its confidence in our region's workforce, our business-friendly climate and our growing emphasis on sustainability," said Wayne Hall, chairman of the Charleston Regional Development Alliance. "We are so pleased that this progressive, cutting-edge, green company chose to partner with our community."

When complete, the Berkeley operation will give McGill a combined annual processing capacity of about 500,000 tons from all facilities, including its existing regional operations in North Carolina, Virginia and Ireland.

"The McGill facility represents another step in Berkeley County's drive to become a leader in the field of sustainable waste management," said Colin Martin, BCWS's executive director. "We saw in McGill a green business with a proven record, making it a good fit for our long-term plans to reduce our dependence on landfilling."

According to Lyons, there is a big market for organic soil amendments, especially in coastal areas. "Even more important than sustainable waste management is the fact that local resources will be recycled to make a product that will also be used locally, resulting in positive impacts to the region's stormwater management and water conservation efforts," he explained. "Compost use reduces stormwater volumes by 30 to 50 percent and irrigation requirements by the same amount. Compost also filters and degrades pollutants, protecting both surface and groundwater quality. It is particularly effective in soils commonly found in coastal zones."

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